Public Open House on new Community Council boundaries

Residents are invited to an open house on Tuesday, May 15 at 7 p.m., Committee Room 2, City Hall, 100 Queen Street West to learn about Community Councils and options for new boundaries.

Toronto City Council must adopt new Community Council boundaries now that the City’s ward boundaries a re changing.The City of Toronto wants your input; You can also submit your ideas online by 5 p.m. on May 25, 2018.

The feedback collected will help inform the City Manager’s recommendations to Council on Toronto’s new Community Council boundaries. Information on population forecasts, past Community Council activities and reviews, and recommendations from the City’s 2017 Ward Boundary Review will also be considered.

Residents are invited to drop by anytime during the open house to learn more about Community Councils and the options for new boundaries and provide feedback.

Why do we need new Community Council boundaries?

Community Councils are made up of groupings of City wards and their membership comprises the City Councillors of those wards. Each Community Council represents a geographic area of the city.

Toronto City Council must adopt new Community Council boundaries because the City’s ward boundaries will change December 1, 2018 – Cabbagetown, for instance, used to be in “Ward 28” and will now be in “Ward 23”, which roughly is the northern half of our former ward, north of Shuter Street. Currently, each of the four Community Councils have 10 to 12 wards; however, the total number of wards is increasing from 44 to 47. The old Community Council boundaries won’t line up with the new ward boundaries and adjustments are needed to accommodate the three new wards.

 Community Council responsibilities include making recommendations and decisions on local planning and development, as well as neighbourhood matters including traffic plans and parking regulations. Community Councils report to City Council but they also have final decision-making power on certain items, such as traffic and parking, fence by-law exemptions and appointments to local boards and Business Improvement Areas.
Find out more about Community Councils.

This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

We respect your privacy. Your email address will not be published. If you prefer that your name not appear, please enter "Anonymous" in the Name field.